holistic

Healings in Los Angeles

Healings in Los Angeles

Hands on Healing Session involving body release, intuitive guidance, and sound healing. Booking sessions now in the Pico Robertson area of Los Angeles on May 11th-22nd, 2013. ghunter199@aol.com or (646) 296-2194 to schedule or to ask questions. $35 discount available!

Categories: Bloodline, bloodline healing project, family tree, g kamana hunter, george hunter, healer, healers, holistic, kamana hunter, Mohawk, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Touched by Healing in Hawaii

SAMSUNG

Oahu, Hawaii.  Kaneohe

At the Papahana Kualoa Waipao taro farm, I was invited to a public gathering of healers and hula dancers called the Pā I Ke Ola – Touched by Healing event.  It began with a Hawaiian oli (chant) to open the honoring ceremony, followed by traditional Hula dancing.  Each song  that was sung and danced honored a different aspect of Hawaiian culture, including the beautiful land of Kaneohe where the event took place.

1364675729918

In the distance, a wonderful mist covered the tops of the Ko’olau mountains in Kaneohe.  Participants crossed the nearby stream to view the taro patches that were fed by the fresh water.  Taro, which is the staple traditional food of Hawaii, had been planted in traditional fashion and used to make poi (mashed taro).

SAMSUNG

There was a tent for people to receive lomi lomi, the Hawaiian bodywork that incorporates massage, bone/joint adjustment, as well as spiritual cleansing.  Students of Kumu (teacher) Alva Andrews set up their stations, with some working on massage tables and other working on traditional Hawaiian mats.  The traditional Hawaiian music gave way to more modern blues as a live band played in the background as they began to serve the delicious food.

Traditional Hawaiian foods were served including Ulu (breadfruit), Kalo pa’a (steamed taro), and Laulau’s (meat and fish filled taro leaf packets).

In the past, I have received powerful lomi lomi sessions from Enrick Ortiz, one of Kumu Alva Andrew’s original students.  After years of hearing about uncle Alva from Enrick, I finally had a chance to meet his mentor who was being honored at Pa I Ke Ola. Kumu Alva has studied with lomi lomi master Kumu John Kalua and also studied ho’oponopono (traditional Hawaiian counseling/mind healing) with Aunty Abbi Napeahi.  His big hearted approach to healing lead him to also study outside of his own tradition with Hindu Master Gaush Supun.  These trainings have melded together to craft his own unique style of healing which he shares openly with people of all backgrounds.

SAMSUNG

The Hula dancers and lomi lomi practitioners, honored lomi lomi Kumu Alva Andrews.

Under the Lomi tent at the conference, a mutual friend, Aunty Diane Stevens-Poire, introduced me to Kumu Alva.  As we engaged in honi, the traditional Hawaiian greeting where our noses met and we breathed in each others’ breath, I felt a rush of care from Kumu Alva. The purpose of the honi is to have a pure exchange of each person’s Ha (breath of life), a moment to truly share each others essence.

We talked story, as I shared with him my training in the Iroquois healing arts that were transmitted to me through my uncle. He said, “your tradition is Native American, and mine is Native Hawaiian, but in the end it’s all the same spirit.  We just have different vocabulary.  All peoples come from the same source.”  He smiled brightly, then invited me to gather with him again to talk more about how to build that bridge between our different approaches to healing.  I felt honored by his respect.

It really warmed my heart to see these ancient practices in Hawaii continue on with the younger generations.

Categories: george hunter, hawaii, healer, healers, healing, holistic, Huffington, Hula, Kamana, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Return of the Healer

Welcome.  This blog is the journal of a traveling Healer, in which I share how a Healer sees the world.  Whether I am working with a client one on one, working on a community healing event, or sharing a Healer’s point of view on world events, the stories aim to help you find growth from struggle.

A few years ago, I went into a dentists office to get a cavity filled.  On the intake forms, it asked for my occupation.  Since I have worked as a Healer full-time for several years, I put “Healer” on the form.  The dentist went through the form and stopped at occupation.  “You’re a…huh?”  She said.  I explained to her that I had been trained by an uncle in the oral traditions of Iroquois (Native American) medicine as a child.  Later, I studied with other Healers, both in the US and also in the Amazon Rainforest. After years of study, I gave a healing session to an open minded physician.  She was so impressed with the experience that she referred me my first clients.  Eventually I was able to build a private practice and leave my Research Associate position at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.  I have worked as a Healer ever since.

The Dentist was curious, so she asked, “But what exactly do you do?”
I answered that through ceremony, intuitive guidance, storytelling, and hands on healing, I help people release the trapped stories of their lives.  Regrets, resentment, fear, and insecurity can be carried in our bodies in the form of stress.  Stress is not random.  Stress has a history.  When the story of our stress is held in our bodies long enough, it can affect our relationships and also affect the physical health of our bodies.  I specialize in finding ways to help people release their stress and learn from the unfinished story which they were holding. 

In modern times, Healers do exist, although our society has lost recognition of this ancient role.  Medicine men and women still function in indigenous societies and professional Healers are nestled into offices throughout major cities.  I have met many health practitioners who serve as Healers in the form of Physicians, Nurses, Clergy, Educators, and Therapists.  Each role represents a color of paint on the palate of health care.  Think of professional Healers as a very old and still relivant shade of help.

Check back for my weekly posts on Sundays.  My next post will address the Riots in Egypt.

Categories: alternative, Bloodline, cairo, cancer, egypt, egyptian, family tree, healer, healing, holistic, Hunter, Kamana, medicine, Mohawk, native american, stress, travel | 2 Comments

Blog at WordPress.com.